The rhino has been around for at least 50 million years; however, if something is not done immediately to stop poachers from killing rhinos for their horns, they might not make it to the end of the century.

The demand in the poaching market for ivory and rhino horns has soared to new heights, becoming a new source of income for arms-dealers and cartels. Not much is done in Africa to stop poachers, which is the source for the majority of rhino horns, and the penalties are rarely enforced in Asia, where the horns usually end up. Many organized crime groups are starting to look to poaching for income; the risks are low and the profit margin is huge.


When I first heard about this, I didn't even understand why someone would be so interested in acquiring a rhino horn. I mean, what would you even do with it? The reason for this senseless slaughter is based on an ancient myth.

Rhino horns are made of keratin. Keratin is a gelatinous hair that possesses absolutely no medical benefits. Chinese medicine lists keratin as being able to reduce fever and convulsions. Even if it did work, is it worth losing an entire species?

Ancient lore says that rhino horns can cure diseases and prevent aging, but consuming the horn is just like eating your fingernails...

The horns are with $30,000 per pound.

If the the rhinos don't die during the mutilation, they become extremely vulnerable to infection.

If a poacher is caught, they face up to 25 years in prison.

Thankfully, the white rhino is protected by armed guards, 24/7.

Pictured below is Sudan, the only male northern white rhino left on our planet, being fed by his caretaker at Ol Pejeta.

Along with Sudan, their are also two female white rhinos left as well. This subspecies could go extinct overnight. Please share this story with your family and friends so we can help preserve the white rhinos!