Uplifting

Photographer Captured Squirrels Every Day For Six Years And Here Are The Incredible Results

Nearly six years ago, Dutch/Swedish photographer Geert Weggen found a fox on his front porch. He immediately ran back into his home to get some meat for the animal.

The fox started coming back every day for more food. Weggen took this gift from mother nature as an opportunity to start taking more photographs and begin his career as an animal photographer.

He now specializes in photographing red squirrels and other magical animals!

More info: geertweggen.com | Instagram | Facebook | flickr.com | geertweggen.com

Photo credit: geertweggen.com

Geert Weggen says himself:

"By the end of a second week, the fox would come to the balcony where it interacted with various props I used for photography.

Soon before late, a Russian bird paid me a visit and continued on doing so daily. Suddenly, my balcony had become a studio filled with nature props, cameras, mirrors, etc.

The bird followed me, and I followed the bird with my camera, as it searched for hidden food in scenes that I had created.

Eventually, red squirrels appeared, and they still come daily to my outside studio. Little did I know back then that it would become my living.

Since last year I have been organizing Squirrel workshops at home. These workshops are held to occur two times a year when the young squirrels arrive.

A maximum of 3 participants can join this 5-day workshop."

Photo credit: geertweggen.com

Photo credit: geertweggen.com

Photo credit: geertweggen.com

While Weggen's obsession with red squirrels may seem strange on the outside, it has actually given us a view of a wondrous world we know very little about.

We think we know the lives of these squirrels, Weggen is able to capture them in ways we've only seen before in Disney movies.

His photography is truly magical!

Photo credit: geertweggen.com

Photo credit: geertweggen.com

Photo credit: geertweggen.com

Most people are quite used to the sight of squirrels, but the ways in which Weggen is able to capture them, makes these little creatures feel much more human like.

Never thought i'd be more in love with squirrels than I am right now!

hey are just all so adorable!

Watching them play with these tiny human like objects and working together brings a smile to my face.

Photo credit: geertweggen.com

Photo credit: geertweggen.com

Photo credit: geertweggen.com

Keep scrolling to see the full collection of his pictures featuring the beautiful red squirrels.

Photo credit: geertweggen.com

Photo credit: geertweggen.com

Photo credit: geertweggen.com

Photo credit: geertweggen.com

Photo credit: geertweggen.com

Here is a photo from the time that Weggen reversed roles and let the squirrel take a picture of him!

Photo credit: geertweggen.com

Photo credit: geertweggen.com

Photo credit: geertweggen.com

Photo credit: geertweggen.com

Photo credit: geertweggen.com

Photo credit: geertweggen.com

Photo credit: geertweggen.com

Photo credit: geertweggen.com

Photo credit: geertweggen.com

Photo credit: geertweggen.com

Photo credit: geertweggen.com

Photo credit: geertweggen.com

Photo credit: geertweggen.com

Photo credit: geertweggen.com

Photo credit: geertweggen.com

Photo credit: geertweggen.com

Photo credit: geertweggen.com

Photo credit: geertweggen.com

Photo credit: geertweggen.com

Photo credit: geertweggen.com

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Source: www.powerfulmind.co

Hopefully this brought a smile to your face and brightened your day.

Nature

Baby Tortoises Found On Galapagos Island For The First Time In Over 100 Years

This is the first time in over a century that even a single baby tortoise was sighted on the Galapagos island of Pinzón.

After years of human activity that has devastated the population of tortoises, the recent birth of these little shelled babies is a huge step in the right direction.

We are now seeing critically endangered animals coming back from the brink of extinction.

"I'm amazed that the tortoises gave us the opportunity to make up for our mistakes after so long," says researcher James Gibbs who was among the first to see the hatchlings in December, told The Dodo.

Photo credit: James Gibbs

Sailors first landed on the island in the mid 18th century. At that time, they unknowingly introduced foreign species such as rats to the natural environment.

The rats that snuck aboard the ship during travel ended up getting off on the island paradise and decimated the tortoise population. The eggs were one of the main sources of food for the rats.

There are few other natural predators on the island, so the rat population flourished. Rats began to multiply and this nearly eradicated the island's tortoise population.

It got so bad that not a single tortoise offspring was able to survive the disaster decades after the rats were first introduced.

This environmental catastrophe has taken generations to correct.

But now that we've seen the mistake that previous humans have created for this majestic animal, and humans have been able to help save them.

Photo credit: Wikimedia

Conservationists were able to launch a joint effort to save the species with only 100 tortoises remaining in the 1960s.

They searched the island to find the last few remaining unhatched eggs and incubated them on another island.

The eggs were hatched and raised on that island for nearly five years, until they were large enough to not be attacked by the rats before they were introduced back to the island.

However, the rodents still devoured any eggs that were remaining on the island.

It wasn't until 2012 that biologist were able to develop and distribute a poison using helicopters that was designed to only attract rats.

"The incredible eradication of rats on this island, done by the park service and others, has created the opportunity for the tortoises to breed for the first time," says Gibbs.

Photo credit: James Gibbs

"We did a survey [in December] to see if it was working for the tortoises, and we found 10 new hatchlings. This is the first time they've bred in the wild in more than a century."

And while 10 might not seem like a the biggest baby boom, Gibbs says it's just the tip of the iceberg:

"Given projection probabilities, I'm sure there were a hundred times more hatchlings out there."

In all, Gibbs and his team spotted 300 tortoises on their trip, and suggests that there are now more than 500 estimated to be currently living on the island.

Great job team!

Source: www.powerfulmind.co

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